Plant a Day

Hopefully
plantsiveidentified:

Trifolium fragiferum28/11/2013Family: Fabaceae (Pea)Genus: TrifoliumSpecies: T. fragiferum Common Name:  Strawberry Clover Location: NT650792Habitat: Growing just behind the intertidal zone of a beach. Nearby species included Hyoscyamus niger, Geranium pratense and Echium vulgare.Determiner: Dr. Richard MilneAuthority: Linnaeus.

plantsiveidentified:

Trifolium fragiferum
28/11/2013
Family: Fabaceae (Pea)
Genus: Trifolium
Species: T. fragiferum 
Common Name: 
 Strawberry Clover 
Location: NT650792
Habitat: Growing just behind the intertidal zone of a beach. Nearby species included Hyoscyamus niger, Geranium pratense and Echium vulgare.
Determiner: Dr. Richard Milne
Authority: Linnaeus.

indefenseofplants:

Parasitism in plants is a spectrum. What I mean by this is that the ways in which plants have evolved a parasitic lifestyle ranges from somewhat parasitic to entirely parasitic. The lines are blurred and as time goes by I am sure that research will reveal even more examples. However, since I already talked about a plant that was fully reliant on a parasitic lifestyle, I would like to discuss some that are only partially parasitic. Meet Pedicularis groenlandica or, as the flowers may suggest, elephant’s head! This is probably one of my favorite western species. Seeing it in person is quite an experience. It is native to the western U.S. and most of Canada. This member of the broomrape family, Orobanchaceae, is what we call a hemiparasite. Hemiparasitism is a type of partial parasitism. The plant does produce fern-like leaves that do undergo photosynthesis but by using specialized root structures called haustoria that grow into the roots of other plants, hemiparasites can obtain nutrients that way. Houstoria do not grow into the cells of other plants, instead they weave their way in between the cells, which, to me, is quite interesting. It is worth noting that, to the best of my knowledge, all members of the broomrape family are parasites on some level. Many take it to the fullest and do not produce any of their own chlorophyll while many other genera are hemiparasites like elephant’s head. Parasitism in the plant world is a fascinating topic of study. How and why the varied strategies evolved separately over many different families is a fun mystery. Enjoy these plants in the wild as the are incredibly difficult to establish from seed in a garden setting. If anyone has had success in germinating and growing these species, please chime in!
www.facebook.com/indefenseofplants

indefenseofplants:

Parasitism in plants is a spectrum. What I mean by this is that the ways in which plants have evolved a parasitic lifestyle ranges from somewhat parasitic to entirely parasitic. The lines are blurred and as time goes by I am sure that research will reveal even more examples. However, since I already talked about a plant that was fully reliant on a parasitic lifestyle, I would like to discuss some that are only partially parasitic. 

Meet Pedicularis groenlandica or, as the flowers may suggest, elephant’s head! This is probably one of my favorite western species. Seeing it in person is quite an experience. It is native to the western U.S. and most of Canada. This member of the broomrape family, Orobanchaceae, is what we call a hemiparasite. Hemiparasitism is a type of partial parasitism. The plant does produce fern-like leaves that do undergo photosynthesis but by using specialized root structures called haustoria that grow into the roots of other plants, hemiparasites can obtain nutrients that way. 

Houstoria do not grow into the cells of other plants, instead they weave their way in between the cells, which, to me, is quite interesting. It is worth noting that, to the best of my knowledge, all members of the broomrape family are parasites on some level. Many take it to the fullest and do not produce any of their own chlorophyll while many other genera are hemiparasites like elephant’s head. 

Parasitism in the plant world is a fascinating topic of study. How and why the varied strategies evolved separately over many different families is a fun mystery. Enjoy these plants in the wild as the are incredibly difficult to establish from seed in a garden setting. If anyone has had success in germinating and growing these species, please chime in!

www.facebook.com/indefenseofplants

(via thehopefulbotanymajor)

pixieidentifies:

Scientific Name: Melampyrum sylvaticumEnglish Name: Small Cow-WheatSwedish Name: Skogskovall
In comparison to M. pratense, which has yellow and white flowers, the small cow-wheat has completely yellow (and smaller) flowers. The plant can be found throughout Sweden and prefers open, moist, and nutrient-rich forests.
The small cow-wheat seed is dispersed by insects, primarily ants. Read more here: x.

pixieidentifies:

Scientific Name: Melampyrum sylvaticum
English Name: Small Cow-Wheat
Swedish Name: Skogskovall

In comparison to M. pratense, which has yellow and white flowers, the small cow-wheat has completely yellow (and smaller) flowers. The plant can be found throughout Sweden and prefers open, moist, and nutrient-rich forests.

The small cow-wheat seed is dispersed by insects, primarily ants. Read more here: x.

(via mamisgarden)

rhamphotheca:

Spiderlilies (genus Hymenocallis) 
… are native flowers occurring in damp habitats throughout the southeastern United States. Their distinctive spidery flowers, which give them their common name, are often fragrant. Some species may bloom as early as March in the southern parts of their range. They grow from bulbs, and may occasionally be found for sale among other bulb-grown species like tulips or daffodils. 
They are members of the Amaryllis Family (Amaryllidaceae), which also contains other familiar spring bulbs like daffodils or snowdrops (both native to Europe). The most widespread is Northern Spiderlily (H. occidentalis), which grows as far north as southwestern Indiana. This image is of Spring Spiderlily (H. liriosme), found through the central southeast. photo by Sweetbay (sweetbay103.blogspot.ca)
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Spiderlilies (genus Hymenocallis)

… are native flowers occurring in damp habitats throughout the southeastern United States. Their distinctive spidery flowers, which give them their common name, are often fragrant. Some species may bloom as early as March in the southern parts of their range. They grow from bulbs, and may occasionally be found for sale among other bulb-grown species like tulips or daffodils.

They are members of the Amaryllis Family (Amaryllidaceae), which also contains other familiar spring bulbs like daffodils or snowdrops (both native to Europe). The most widespread is Northern Spiderlily (H. occidentalis), which grows as far north as southwestern Indiana. This image is of Spring Spiderlily (H. liriosme), found through the central southeast.

photo by Sweetbay (sweetbay103.blogspot.ca)

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

deusofnull:

The florid crown of Utricularia vulgaris, who by means of creating a negative pressure region within tiny sacks in the water, via active osmosis, sucks in prey in under a 100th of a second.  One of the most successful plants within the carnivorous flora niche.  Quite beautiful flowers for us to look at, but if your a Daphnia (water flea) or Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) then watch out. 

deusofnull:

The florid crown of Utricularia vulgaris, who by means of creating a negative pressure region within tiny sacks in the water, via active osmosis, sucks in prey in under a 100th of a second.  One of the most successful plants within the carnivorous flora niche.  Quite beautiful flowers for us to look at, but if your a Daphnia (water flea) or Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) then watch out. 

(via stickytraps)

orchid-a-day:

Dendrobium sulphureum 
Syn.: Pedilonum sulphureum 
April 14, 2014

orchid-a-day:

Dendrobium sulphureum 

Syn.: Pedilonum sulphureum 

April 14, 2014

ecobota:

bartramsinbloom:

Erythronium americanum
American Trout-Lily
April 11, 2014

Growing in the Native Woodland garden, near the American Chestnut tree

Taken at Bartram’s Garden, Philadelphia Pennsylvania

earthwork:

Toona sinensis; Fragrant Spring Tree, Chinese Cedar — Edible young leaves have a roasted garlic and raw onion flavor, used in stir fries or dried as a spice. Leaves can be green, but the pink variety supposedly tastes better…The wood is very durable, and is used much like mahogany, taking a fine polish. Delicately scented, it is burnt in temples as incense. Protected stands are cultivated in greenhouses in China for fresh Toon leaf on Chinese New Year. It takes well to coppicing (seasonal cutting), so it can be kept low enough for ease of harvest.

The icing on the cake is the medicinal/nutritional quality of the leaf: The fresh young leaves are high in protein for a vegetable, and contain vitamins B1, B2, and high levels of vitamins C and E. They are relatively high in beta-carotene, and high in calcium and iron. In an evaluation of the antioxidant activity, vitamin C content and total phenolic content of 20 tested vegetables, Chinese cedar came top in antioxidant activity, top in total phenolics, and high in vitamin C content. 

Likes full sun, otherwise not picky about soil. Hardy as far north as zone 5, native to woodlands.

(via mamisgarden)