Plant a Day

Hopefully
libutron:

Yellow Pitcher Plants
A small group of Sarracenia flava rubricorpora (Sarraceniaceae).
The species produces pitchers only in the spring and phyllodia (pitcherless leaves) in late summer. The flowers are bright yellow, quite large, and tend to have a musky “feline” odor.
The subspecies shown, Sarracenia flava rubricorpora, has a red tube, with the lid veined and either yellow or green. This plant is very beautiful, but unfortunately usually only produces a single large pitcher per rosette each year, so fields of this variety are somewhat sparsely pitchered. It is A rare plant, it is only found in the Florida panhandle.
References: [1] - [2] Photo credit: ©Julie Tew | Apalachicola National Forest, Liberty County, Florida, US (2014)

libutron:

Yellow Pitcher Plants

A small group of Sarracenia flava rubricorpora (Sarraceniaceae).

The species produces pitchers only in the spring and phyllodia (pitcherless leaves) in late summer. The flowers are bright yellow, quite large, and tend to have a musky “feline” odor.

The subspecies shown, Sarracenia flava rubricorpora, has a red tube, with the lid veined and either yellow or green. This plant is very beautiful, but unfortunately usually only produces a single large pitcher per rosette each year, so fields of this variety are somewhat sparsely pitchered. It is A rare plant, it is only found in the Florida panhandle.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Julie Tew | Apalachicola National Forest, Liberty County, Florida, US (2014)

(via 6vladenka6)

jeanpolfus:

Common chicory (Cichorium intybus) goes by many names including cornflower, blue daisy, horseweed, and bachelor’s buttons. The flowers are usually bright blue. I was lucky to find some white flowers because they are quite rare. Interestingly, the roots of some varieties can be used as a coffee substitute. The flowers grow wild along roadsides across North America though it is native to Europe. Argyle, Wisconsin.

libutron:

Fallen flowers of Brachychiton tree on rainforest floor, Australia | ©Bruce Thomson  (Bunya Mountains, Queensland, Australia - 2007)
Most of the 30 odd species of the genus Brachychiton (Malvaceae) are endemic to Australia. They produce stunning sprays or clusters of colourful blooms, often on bare branches before the new foliage appears. The trunks are shapely and sometimes swollen. 
Large, boat-shaped woody seed capsules appear after flowering is finished. These trees are very popular as ornamental specimens and are often seen in parks or gracing suburban streets. Most of the species are favored by birds. 
Reference: [1]

libutron:

Fallen flowers of Brachychiton tree on rainforest floor, Australia | ©Bruce Thomson  (Bunya Mountains, Queensland, Australia - 2007)

Most of the 30 odd species of the genus Brachychiton (Malvaceae) are endemic to Australia. They produce stunning sprays or clusters of colourful blooms, often on bare branches before the new foliage appears. The trunks are shapely and sometimes swollen.

Large, boat-shaped woody seed capsules appear after flowering is finished. These trees are very popular as ornamental specimens and are often seen in parks or gracing suburban streets. Most of the species are favored by birds. 

Reference: [1]

(via thehopefulbotanymajor)

rhamphotheca:

Western Redcedars (Thuja plicata) 
… are among North America’s largest trees. They can reach diameters of 10-13 ft (3-4 m) and heights of 213-230 ft (65-70 m), though they are still typically only one-third the volume of Giant Sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum). 
Large individuals may be many centuries old. One in British Columbia was estimated at around 700 years old when it was destroyed by vandals; when it fell, it was so massive the impact effectively dug its own “grave”. Redcedars are reknowned for their timber. 
They have high-quality wood with few knots, but what makes them especially appealing is Thujaplicin, a chemical that occurs naturally in mature trees and functions as a fungicide, preventing rot. The anti-fungal chemicals remain effective for up to a century after the tree is harvested. 
Shown is the Kalaloch Redcedar of Olympic National Park in Washington, which was the third-largest known individual of the species until it was destroyed in a storm earlier this year.photo by woodleywonderworks on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Western Redcedars (Thuja plicata)

… are among North America’s largest trees. They can reach diameters of 10-13 ft (3-4 m) and heights of 213-230 ft (65-70 m), though they are still typically only one-third the volume of Giant Sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum).

Large individuals may be many centuries old. One in British Columbia was estimated at around 700 years old when it was destroyed by vandals; when it fell, it was so massive the impact effectively dug its own “grave”. Redcedars are reknowned for their timber.

They have high-quality wood with few knots, but what makes them especially appealing is Thujaplicin, a chemical that occurs naturally in mature trees and functions as a fungicide, preventing rot. The anti-fungal chemicals remain effective for up to a century after the tree is harvested.

Shown is the Kalaloch Redcedar of Olympic National Park in Washington, which was the third-largest known individual of the species until it was destroyed in a storm earlier this year.

photo by woodleywonderworks on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

(via kihaku-gato)

orchid-a-day:

Pleurothallopsis monetalis
Syn.: Octomeria monetalis; Restrepiopsis monetalis; Restrepiopsis pulchella
August 13, 2014

orchid-a-day:

Pleurothallopsis monetalis

Syn.: Octomeria monetalis; Restrepiopsis monetalis; Restrepiopsis pulchella

August 13, 2014

(via indefenseofplants)

kihaku-gato:

Not gonna lie, I did not expect my Kaffir Lily (Clivia miniata) to flower this summer, and I was frankly expecting to wait for flowers for another few years (Just one year ago I made a post showing the college specimens while I droned on how long my own was taking to reach flowering age). Guess it decided to surprise me. While it flowers I have placed it on the little table here so that the flowers can be better enjoyed. Its flowerhead is nowhere near as impressive as specimens I’ve seen before, but that could be due to either not getting enough nutrients/sunlight, genetic differences, or because it’s still a young specimen. Either way I hope it flowers on a yearly basis from here on out like some of my other flowering houseplants!

Photographed August 10th 2014

(via johnpcaruso)

jillraggett:

Plant of the Day
Wednesday 13 August 2014

A sure sign that autumn is around the corner the first Colchicum species (autumn crocus) are flowering at the Royal Horticultural Society Garden at Hyde Hall, Essex. This one was labelled Colchicum bivonae. The flowers appear without the foliage and they need not to be obscured by other plants. Their leaves appear in the early spring and need much more space than the flowers so thought is needed in a design to allow for them. They suit shaded woodland locations.

Jill Raggett

libutron:

The Elephant yam - A striking aroid used as food, fodder and medical
Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Alismatales - Araceae) is a large aroid, which is found throughout Asia. In the wild it is ruderal in habit and grows in a very wide range of moist, semi-shaded to open, secondary and disturbed forests, shrublands, scrubs and grasslands. It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its striking compound foliage and unusual and dramatic flowering and fruiting structures.
The plant produces a single inflorescence (flowering spike) crowned with a bulbous maroon knob and encircled by a fleshy maroon and green-blotched bract. After the growing season, this dies back to an underground storage organ (tuber).
Commonly known as Elephant yam, it is one of the staple food plants of tropical Asia, and is extensively cultivated for its edible tubers, which are the third most important carbohydrate source after rice and maize in Indonesia. They are also consumed widely in India and Sri Lanka, although elsewhere they are seen as a famine crop, to be used when more popular staples, such as rice, are in short supply.
Elephant yam has medicinal properties and is used in many Ayurvedic (traditional Hindu) preparations. Severals studies have been done on the properties of this plant. Several experimental studies have been done on the properties of this plant, showing that tuber extract has real antioxidant activity and inhibition of hepatic cell proliferation in cancer, however this has only been proven in experimental protocols with mice.
Other common names: Elephant foot yam, Whitespot giant arum, Stink lily, Telinga potato.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©tpholland | Locality: cultivated - Par, England, UK (2012)

libutron:

The Elephant yam - A striking aroid used as food, fodder and medical

Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Alismatales - Araceae) is a large aroid, which is found throughout Asia. In the wild it is ruderal in habit and grows in a very wide range of moist, semi-shaded to open, secondary and disturbed forests, shrublands, scrubs and grasslands. It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its striking compound foliage and unusual and dramatic flowering and fruiting structures.

The plant produces a single inflorescence (flowering spike) crowned with a bulbous maroon knob and encircled by a fleshy maroon and green-blotched bract. After the growing season, this dies back to an underground storage organ (tuber).

Commonly known as Elephant yam, it is one of the staple food plants of tropical Asia, and is extensively cultivated for its edible tubers, which are the third most important carbohydrate source after rice and maize in Indonesia. They are also consumed widely in India and Sri Lanka, although elsewhere they are seen as a famine crop, to be used when more popular staples, such as rice, are in short supply.

Elephant yam has medicinal properties and is used in many Ayurvedic (traditional Hindu) preparations. Severals studies have been done on the properties of this plant. Several experimental studies have been done on the properties of this plant, showing that tuber extract has real antioxidant activity and inhibition of hepatic cell proliferation in cancer, however this has only been proven in experimental protocols with mice.

Other common names: Elephant foot yam, Whitespot giant arum, Stink lily, Telinga potato.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©tpholland | Locality: cultivated - Par, England, UK (2012)

(via thehopefulbotanymajor)