Plant a Day

Hopefully
rhamphotheca:

Rocky Mountain National Park - CO, USA
What’s Blooming? 
The Rybergia grandiflora, or Alpine Sunflower can be seen growing throughout the treeless Alpine Tundra Ecosystem. This is a great blooming year for these flowers, as it usually takes 15-20 years for the roots to gather enough energy to bloom. Come out and discover the unique ecosystem of the tundra at your Rocky Mountain National Park! - ch 
photo taken by Ranger KP

rhamphotheca:

What’s Blooming?

The Rybergia grandiflora, or Alpine Sunflower can be seen growing throughout the treeless Alpine Tundra Ecosystem. This is a great blooming year for these flowers, as it usually takes 15-20 years for the roots to gather enough energy to bloom. Come out and discover the unique ecosystem of the tundra at your Rocky Mountain National Park! - ch

photo taken by Ranger KP

libutron:

The shades of blue of the Willdenow’s Spikemoss
Selaginella willdenowii (Selaginellales - Selaginellaceae) is a species of spikemoss. Although sometimes these plants are commonly called Peacock ferns, they are not true ferns but fern-like plants or fern-allies.
It is a scrambling terrestrial plant with blue-green fronds that exhibit amazing iridescence when young, appearing to change color from different shades of blue, green and purple, depending on the light and angle, and turn pink, red and purple when exposed over time to bright sunlight. The blue leaves gradually turn to green with age or exposure to more direct light.
Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the presence of a layered lamellar structure of the upper cuticle of iridescent leaves as being responsible for the blue iridescence. A recent research on this topic do not support the idea that iridescence in plants acts to enhance light capture of photosynthetically important wavelengths, because the reflectance of light in the range 600–700 nm is very similar for both iridescent and non-iridescent leaves. 
However, it has been hypothesized some other adaptive advantages that leaf iridescence may offer, such as a visual defense against herbivores, a mechanism to protect shade-adapted plants against sun-flecks and other potentially damaging sudden high light levels, and a polarization filter enhancing orientation of photosynthetic apparatus within the cell. 
Native to Myanmar, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, this species  has now been naturalized in many countries after been introduced as a garden ornamental.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Driss & Marrionn | Locality: Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

libutron:

The shades of blue of the Willdenow’s Spikemoss

Selaginella willdenowii (Selaginellales - Selaginellaceae) is a species of spikemoss. Although sometimes these plants are commonly called Peacock ferns, they are not true ferns but fern-like plants or fern-allies.

It is a scrambling terrestrial plant with blue-green fronds that exhibit amazing iridescence when young, appearing to change color from different shades of blue, green and purple, depending on the light and angle, and turn pink, red and purple when exposed over time to bright sunlight. The blue leaves gradually turn to green with age or exposure to more direct light.

Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the presence of a layered lamellar structure of the upper cuticle of iridescent leaves as being responsible for the blue iridescence. A recent research on this topic do not support the idea that iridescence in plants acts to enhance light capture of photosynthetically important wavelengths, because the reflectance of light in the range 600–700 nm is very similar for both iridescent and non-iridescent leaves. 

However, it has been hypothesized some other adaptive advantages that leaf iridescence may offer, such as a visual defense against herbivores, a mechanism to protect shade-adapted plants against sun-flecks and other potentially damaging sudden high light levels, and a polarization filter enhancing orientation of photosynthetic apparatus within the cell. 

Native to Myanmar, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, this species  has now been naturalized in many countries after been introduced as a garden ornamental.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Driss & Marrionn | Locality: Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

(via kale-black-invader)

desixlb:

the splendid and super cool achiote tree (bixa orellana) with its red, spiny fruit. which bear the flavorful anatto seeds.  

allerton garden, national tropical botanical garden.

kauai, hawaii.

© desixlb 2014

bartramsinbloom:

Monarda didymaBee BalmJuly 12, 2014Growing in the native woodland garden. I was so close to snapping a photo of a Ruby Throated Hummingbird who was drinking from this bloom, but they are fast

bartramsinbloom:

Monarda didyma
Bee Balm
July 12, 2014

Growing in the native woodland garden. I was so close to snapping a photo of a Ruby Throated Hummingbird who was drinking from this bloom, but they are fast

(via tferebnu)

homobotanica:

Buddleja x weyeriana “Golden Glow”
L’avantage de cet hybride de buddleja globosa et de davidiic’est qu’il ne se ressème pas.
Nice light gray foliage, it is non-invasive because it’s a sterile hybrid.

homobotanica:

Buddleja x weyeriana “Golden Glow”

L’avantage de cet hybride de buddleja globosa et de davidiic’est qu’il ne se ressème pas.

Nice light gray foliage, it is non-invasive because it’s a sterile hybrid.

(via misadventured-piteous-overthrows)

cactguy:

Discocactus flagelliformis / Rat Tail Cactus
Timberline Gardens, Arvada, Colorado

While touring the grounds, owner Kelly Grummons mentioned a few of his favorite plants, including this rat tail cactus, which he has had since his youth.  He said it is like a mascot for the nursery - and it is quite beautiful.

(via tferebnu)

libutron:

ʻAmaʻu
Sadleria cyatheoides (Polypodiales - Blechnaceae), better known as ʻAmaʻu, is a species of fern endemic to the Hawaiian Islands.
This plant can appear as a large, low-growing fern with a creeping rhizome or as a tree fern with an upright, trunk-like rhizome. The new leaves are a distinctive flame-like red to orange color.
The young leaves and the starchy core of the trunk (a traditional Hawaiian famine food) are edible if cooked. This species had many traditional uses among early Hawaiians
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©David Eickhoff
Locality: Hawaii

libutron:

ʻAmaʻu

Sadleria cyatheoides (Polypodiales - Blechnaceae), better known as ʻAmaʻu, is a species of fern endemic to the Hawaiian Islands.

This plant can appear as a large, low-growing fern with a creeping rhizome or as a tree fern with an upright, trunk-like rhizome. The new leaves are a distinctive flame-like red to orange color.

The young leaves and the starchy core of the trunk (a traditional Hawaiian famine food) are edible if cooked. This species had many traditional uses among early Hawaiians

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©David Eickhoff

Locality: Hawaii

(via kihaku-gato)

plantsiveidentified:

Linaria repens14/07/2014Family: Scrophulariaceae (Figwort)Genus: LinariaSpecies: L. repensCommon Name: Pale Toadflax Location: SE521661Habitat: This plant usually grows in dry., bare, grassy places. It was found growing on waste rubble in a brick making facility.Nearby species included Linaria vulgaris and Sisymbrium officinale.Collector: Ewan ColeAuthority: Mill.

plantsiveidentified:

Linaria repens
14/07/2014
Family: Scrophulariaceae (Figwort)
Genus: Linaria
Species: L. repens
Common Name: Pale Toadflax 
Location: SE521661
Habitat: This plant usually grows in dry., bare, grassy places. It was found growing on waste rubble in a brick making facility.Nearby species included Linaria vulgaris and Sisymbrium officinale.
Collector: Ewan Cole
Authority: Mill.

(Source: Pale Toadflax )

kihaku-gato:

Chinese Dogwoood (Cornus kousa var. chinensis) at the Cuddy Gardens. The edible fruits are pretty interesting too, but this is the wrong time of year to be talking about those yet lol.

Photographed June 7th 2014